Chapter 1: What Is Clustering? Up Main page Chapter 3: Network Setup 

2 System Requirements

2.1 Hardware

InterWorx itself has very light hardware requirements - Any machine capable of running CentOS Linux 5 or better can run InterWorx. Generally, the hardware you need is going to be highly dependent on how many domains you are planning on serving.

2.1.1 Cluster Manager

A Cluster Manager needs the following:
  • Two IP addresses: one for the public interface, one as the “quorum” IP which the other servers will use to address the CM, and which the CM will use to send commands to the command queues of the nodes.
  • Large storage device: either internal to the machine, or an externalized device mounted to the CM as /home.
Other than these basic features, you will need to consider the amount of processor capacity, RAM, and storage you will need. InterWorx’s clustering system is very robust in terms of storage management, and customers have had success with many different external or redundant storage systems. iSCSI, all manner of NAS and SAN devices, and even onboard RAIDs are simple enough to integrate as storage systems within InterWorx.
Here are a few typical setups. By all means, these aren’t hard-and-fast requirements, simply suggestions for basic hardware.
  • Light Profile (1-20 domains): 1x physical dual-core CPU, 4GB RAM, 1TB HDD
  • Medium Profile (20-80 domains): Cluster Manager: 2x physical quad-core CPUs, 8GB RAM, 2TB HDD
  • Heavy Profile (80-300 domains): Cluster Manager: 4x physical quad-core CPUs, 16GB RAM, 1TB HDD, 20TB RAID 10 iSCSI array
  • Nodes (each): 2x physical quad-core CPUs, 8GB RAM, 1TB HDD

2.1.2 Cluster Nodes

A Cluster Node is by necessity a much lighter machine than the Cluster Manager. While the CM manages storage and databases, maintains the connections between the nodes and balances the load across the network, nodes are tasked with only a single activity: servicing requests.
  • Light Profile (1-20 domains): 1x physical dual-core CPU, 2GB RAM, 250GB HDD per node
  • Medium Profile (20-80 domains): 1x physical quad-core CPU, 4GB RAM, 500GB HDD per node
  • Heavy Profile (80-300 domains): 2x physical quad-core CPU, 4GB RAM, 500GB HDD per node

2.2 Network

InterWorx uses theipvsadm load balancer provided by the Linux Virtual Server (LVS) project. It is a software load balancer that runs on Linux and FreeBSD systems and works very well as a general purpose load balancer. LVS allows for an array of load balanced setups including:
  • LVS-NAT (Network Address Translation) - Load balancing with clustered nodes using NAT [A][A]More information on LVS-NAT can be found at http://www.linuxvirtualserver.org/VS-NAT.html
  • LVS-DR (Direct Routing) - Load balancing with clustered nodes on the same physical segment using publicly routable IPs [B][B]More information on LVS-DR can be found at http://www.linuxvirtualserver.org/VS-DRouting.html
  • LVS-TUN (IP Tunneling) - Load balancing with clustered nodes over a WAN [C][C]More information on LVS-TUN can be found at http://www.linuxvirtualserver.org/VS-IPTunneling.html

2.3 Software

In order to cluster with InterWorx, you will need CentOS, RedHat, or CloudLinux OS. Of course, InterWorx must be installed, and each server must have its own license key.
 Chapter 1: What Is Clustering? Up Main page Chapter 3: Network Setup 

(C) 2017 by InterWorx LLC